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Thursday, June 11, 2009

The Beauty in Science.

I especially like the quote at the end by the fabulous Neil deGrasse Tyson. As well as his quote about the iron in the giant meteor he mentions being the same iron in our blood. Interconnection is so damn cool!!!

That's in part (and the Sam. Harris quote about meditating in a cave like a mystic [or Buddhist I would add] but not making unjustifiable claims about those experiences) why I like the combination of Buddhism and science. Interconnection makes me feel so at peace and in harmony with all that is.

But back to the Sam Harris quote about being able to meditate but not making unjustifiable claims. Buddhist masters warn students that along the way they will experience all kinds of interesting phenomena in their brains upon deep meditation. However, those experiences are still ego trying to make special claims and declarations that these empty phenomena are something other than distractions. They are in fact (most meditation masters will tell you) false horizons/false feelings of realizing enlightenment. So like a diamond we shine forward and cut through all of these delusions.

You know, when I first started meditating and first go into Buddhism I use to think delusions were mainly ones that made you feel like you were worthless. However, the longer I practice the more I realize that often the hardest delusions to overcome and the ones that cause the most damage and cause the most setbacks to my path are delusions of grandeur.

~Peace to all beings~

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12 comments:

Riverwolf, said...

"Stardust"--yes indeedy. That Tyson guy is really good. Hadn't heard of him before. But he, and Harris, really touch on where I think I stand. Yes, I love to go into those proverbial caves and meditate, but what I don't want to do is make claims about what I experience. This goes to your point about distraction. We are SO easily distracted from the bigger picture, the deeper truth. And yes, delusions of grandeur can cause just as much pain and suffering as can delusions of worthlessness. Great post!

Kyle R Lovett said...

I have to say Tyson is probably one of my favorite Science authors and teachers out there.

Excellent post, thanks!

Gary said...

Nice post. You make a great point about delusions of grandeur. I'm trying to reconcile it with the notion of sensing the basic goodness of the world and ourselves. Perhaps they are two different things and don't need to be reconciled.
Are you saying that there is a tendency to fall into the "god" trap?
Thanks,
Gary

dOBBshead said...

Are false views also a part of the Universe? Co-arising, manifesting, and of interdependent origination, much like the rest of our thoughts?

They call him James Ure said...

Yeah the "God" trap could be included in delusions of grandeur.

They call him James Ure said...

dOBBshead:

I would say yes, all is apart of the universe.

smellincoffee said...

Many thanks for sharing this video: I've never heard the extended Dawkins quotation ("How dare we...") before.

scotty said...

I'm curious where are these Neil deGrasse Tyson video clips from does anyone know??

Tao1776 said...

Comes at a great time, James! Thanks!

EZG said...

I really love this video. I've seen it before, but just had to put my seal of approval on it again. Neil is so cool I can hardly stand it.

iconoclasticbuddha said...

The mind it seems is always looking to reconcile its beliefs with science or whatever so that it can continue on its prescibed path. Ah! but the path is the illusion, whether it is the ideal of Buddhism or any other ism. So if I negate it all who am I and of what use is the "Buddhism" of so called masters? Is it possible to realize the original and uncompromised. That which is not the result of opinion and conclusion, but the outcome of total freedom.

Term said...

Excellent article! I'm been looking for topics as interesting as this. Looking forward to your next post.



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