Search This Blog

Loading...

Buddhism in the News

Loading...

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Historic Buddhist Statues Destroyed in Maldives by Extremists. Why?

(PHOTO CREDIT: "Light of Buddha" by Loster20 for Free Digital Photos.net)

Similar to the Afghan Islamic Taliban’s destruction of the priceless Buddhist and other historic artifacts in 2001, an Islamic Extremist group has vandalized and destroyed precious Buddhist and Hindu statues in the Maldives which can never be made the same again to preserve the history. 

JAMES: This kind of destruction is derived from extremist beliefs, which are almost always rooted in fear of anything different. Any extreme, (whether liberal, conservative or religious) is dangerous because when you believe that you alone are good, and anything not like you is bad, then you're more likely to justify intolerance, destruction and death. The really sad aspect of this story is how anybody can be so consumed with fear and hatred that they feel the need to lash out in such a way.

A person that rotted with rage can not help but be miserable. Deep down inside, in their private moments of reflection, they must be suffering deeply. It's tragic that they can't see that they don't have to live this way to feel happy. Destroying an ancient statue is tragic, but statues crumble with time anyway. Yet hatred never ceases in its ability to destroy happiness, lives, families, countries and whole planets.

~I bow to the Buddha within all beings~

Stumble Upon Toolbar

16 comments:

Confessions of a Wanna Be Yogini. said...

that hurts my heart. <3

BM said...

I wonder if this extreme behavior is resulted from overly attached to their beliefs to the point they formulate this extreme bias views of what they are afraid if their beliefs are taken away, then their purpose in life will be "doom" (as the whole world will be doom). This is ignorance and failure to understand their own religion's teaching. They can destroy historical artifacts, which is the materials, but they can't destroy the teachings and reality(truth).

Lastly....
"May they be well and accept all conditions in the world."
"May they be find peace and take care of themselves happily"
"May they free from suffering"

Chant of Metta : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5JAVk3Qwi8

Kerry Brian Davidson said...

Well said ,

Matt said...

Always sad to read about things like this but would probably be worse not being aware. Fwiw, the people that actually did this were probably just following orders, had no idea what they were really doing.

Reymiland said...

Destruction of the image of Buddha is nothing. It simply proves His belief that nothing is changeless. All things must come to change, and for some that is destruction.
Namaste' to all beings.

Milky Tea said...

Dear Mr.They call him James Ure,

Greetings from someone swimming from a different shore and finding kindred souls adrift and playing in the single Ocean of Mercy....

My abject apology for those 'Muslims' who have declared war on history and humanity. They have found a little 'knowledge' but learn no Adab (courtly manners). In the old days we would have chased them like bandits. But in this present epoch, with too many voices in the 'Muslim' nation driven by hubris and despair, there is a lot of fire-fighting we must do. Your sadness we share, because this same self-declared 'jihadist' of angry young men and bitter old 'sages' have also declared war on Islam's own history and we have seen hundreds of the Prophet's Companions, kin and wives (I kid u not) graves decimated and many, many more saints' tombs destroyed.

Hate has no place in Islam and Love will show the Way. I speak to you as a brethren united in the praise and worship of God...

An anonymous reader quoted your earlier post about humour in the spiritual path (18 August 2011) on my almanac. That led me to you. Despite the sorrowful news you share, I am glad to find a kindred.

I am a nobody, a big fat sinner. But thank you for filling the world with reflections of Goodness. Eh, and sorry for my rambling on in this comment.

Take care, sunshine!

Taufiq.

Milky Tea said...

Dear James,

When I read the first lines of this posting, I immediately commented with great fervor, angry as I was with such bandits!

Now that I have returned to read your posting until the end, this is what I must add here -

You have shown more concern and regards for these perpetrators' own souls than they have themselves. How beautiful Buddha is to have a follower like you...

masyaAllah... I am crying.

Taufiq.

Hanzze said...

Well the Buddha, never encouraged to build monuments image him would maybe say:

A man may plunder
as long as it serves his ends,
but when others are plundered,
he who has plundered
gets plundered in turn.

A fool thinks,
'Now's my chance,'
as long as his evil
has yet to ripen.
But when it ripens,
the fool
falls
into pain.

Killing, you gain
your killer.
Conquering, you gain one
who will conquer you;
insulting, insult;
harassing, harassment.

And so, through the cycle of action,
he who has plundered
gets plundered in turn.

— SN 3.15


to those understanding that every effects had it's cause.

So will learn and some will continue to conquer again and again. Nothing is lasting and suffering has it's cause.

Just for being sure that one does not spread suffering among men:

"Whereas some brahmans and contemplatives, living off food given in faith, are addicted to talking about lowly topics such as these — talking about kings, robbers, ministers of state; armies, alarms, and battles; food and drink; clothing, furniture, garlands, and scents; relatives; vehicles; villages, towns, cities, the countryside; women and heroes; the gossip of the street and the well; tales of the dead; tales of diversity [philosophical discussions of the past and future], the creation of the world and of the sea, and talk of whether things exist or not — he abstains from talking about lowly topics such as these. This, too, is part of his virtue.

is a good advice to help people and one self to get calm.

_()_

_()_

They call him James Ure said...

@BM...I agree. I think it has everything to do with attachments and a false, perceived fear of losing their religion.

@Matt...Yes, even though we can't always stop these things, we can talk about them. Hopefully dialogue can prevent future destruction.

@Reymiland...I agree that it proves nothing is changeless, but I disagree that the destruction means nothing. I don't think it's good to cling to statues but I feel these statues were important for their historical and cultural significance.

Living the ideal of impermanence doesn't mean we have to give up our cultures and history. History is important because it helps us know what not to do as a society and remind us that we can over-come great challenges.

@Taufiq...I appreciate your compassion and understanding of the cultural and historic significance of these statues to Buddhists and the world. Thankfully I know that not all Muslims behave in such a manner. In fact, probably most Muslims aren't like this.

I lived among Muslims in Africa for two years and they were some of the nicest, most compassionate people I've met. It certainly is sad to see that these Muslims even turn on their own. I appreciate your efforts and those of Muslims like you to fight this extremism. As well as showing the world the true nature of Islam. Thank-you for your kindness and may you go in peace.

Dave said...

I can concur with you James. I was only in Africa for a month (and would love a chance to return), and while I was there I was briefly introduced to a Muslim man who had decided to look after some orphaned Christian children.

And it is very nice to to hear from Taufiq. Not because he is apologizing for the errors of some Muslims he doesn't know and for whom he isn't responsible, but just because it always good to see inter-religious and intercultural between everyday people. And with someone from Malaysia no less.

Anonymous said...

there is no one ‘true’ pastoral way of life. The Mormons, Christians, Atheists, Muslims or any other cannot possibly command their pastoral life as best for all. Pastoral life can only be chosen by what has been called solely for them. Thus, contrary to the current political theater, deep personal choices reflected unto the masses rarely work. Whether good or bad, deep personal choices that reflect the greater constitution, can be extremely powerful.

http://unknownbuddhist.com/2012/06/18/a-pastoral-life-and-living-it/

Anonymous said...

There is no one ‘true’ pastoral way of life. The Mormons, Christians, Atheists, Muslims or any other cannot possibly command their pastoral life as best for all. Pastoral life can only be chosen by what has been called solely for them. Thus, contrary to the current political theater, deep personal choices reflected unto the masses rarely work. Whether good or bad, deep personal choices that reflect the greater constitution, can be extremely powerful.

http://unknownbuddhist.com/2012/06/18/a-pastoral-life-and-living-it/

Michael Harry Anifantakis said...

This is a poem in my novel:
This Moment Is My Home


OTHERNESS

seduced, comforted by
the trance of sanctimony,
till judgment slices the judger
like a mirror.
Judge, and become the vibration
of judgment,
carry the burden,
the grudge of it.

Our own lack gives perverse delight
to righteous violence,
the deep satisfaction of certainty,
to know without doubt
our kind are worth more
than a whole class or race or
category of Others.

the Other terrifies us in dark tunnels,
irrational fear driving
its rollercoaster validity,
and we flail back,
stab out at the other
nationality, class,
the other sex, the other color, language, life-style,
the other God.

And the many-edged dagger cuts
also us
off at the knees.


More info at:
www.zenwhisperer.blogspot.com

tiramit said...

Sorry I’m kinda late getting here. The vandalism in Maldives really hit me hard and then I realised that dwelling too much on the the anger and hate just fans the flames. The people who did this are so attached to their extremist state of mind it’s impossible for them to see it any other way. They’re in such profound ignorance (avijjā/avidyā), wrong view is right view. If the circumstances do arise for them to have any kind of wholesome introspective reflection, it’ll go unnoticed. I now find I have some compassion.

tiramit said...

Sorry I’m kinda late getting here. The vandalism in Maldives really hit me hard and then I realised that dwelling too much on the the anger and hate just fans the flames. The people who did this are so attached to their extremist state of mind it’s impossible for them to see it any other way. They’re in such profound ignorance (avijjā/avidyā), wrong view is right view. If the circumstances do arise for them to have any kind of wholesome introspective reflection, it’ll go unnoticed. I now find I have some compassion.

Milky Tea said...

Gee, I didn't know anyone replied to my comments until a gracious soul pointed it out to me earlier this week.

Thank you James and Dave for your kind thoughts. I wonder if I am belabouring a point by commenting to a comment of my comment.

But i always believe that toleranceand compassion are virtues worthy to be belaboured ad infinitum.

Hehehe.

God bless your soul always.

TK.

ShareThis Option